Alyssa  Auch
Alyssa Auch
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Crina Cristea Crina-Ludmila
Becoming a published author today is not hard. Amazon and other platforms offer great support for writers. 
However, being a great successful published author is hard. There are many people out there who are doing it on their own. Myself included. That offers more competition which can be a great thing. Just because now everyone can go on Amazon and self publish doesn't mean they're great at it. It's a process. It's hardwork. Personally, I love that we have this opportunity. Who really wants to make it as a writer,  I believe can do it. I myself do not expect success overnight but I am confident that at least I have a better chance at succeeding in what I am passionate doing. I believe there is a market for my kind of writing and I don't necessary have to please a publisher so he decides to put my work out there. I can do it myself.
A traditional publisher is good if he is invested in your work as a writer and puts the effort to market your work. Otherwise, just being traditionally published doesn't necessary mean success. Let's not forget that less royalties end up with the writer because there are more people involved in the process and everyone has to get paid for their work.

I love the freedom of indie writers. I can design or have someone design my cover. If I don't like it, I have the final saying in what goes out into the world.
If I want a certain passage to stay in the content of the book, it will stay. Now of course, we as writers must listen to beta readers and try to be objective about the work to make it better. We should not rush and have our ego take the best of us. But we have the final decision and for me this is huge. 

Dmitry Selemir
​An interesting post Alyssa. I wonder how important it is to have that ‘published’ title. It used to be a token of some kind of recognition. Somebody — who is doing it professionally, whose livelihood depends on making the right calls most of the time decided to commit the time and money to publish your work — thereby giving the work their seal of approval. That does mean something. I think now the boundary is a lot less solid. The publishing world is changing rapidly and it has advantages and disadvantages of course. The barrier for entry that used to exist is more or less gone and to find that recognition — you don’t need a publisher necessarily. There are examples of authors who were rejected when trying to go down the traditional route only to find success via self publishing. So what is that token of approval that people can show now? The number of 5-star reviews on Amazon or is it the number of followers or is it the number of times people downloaded and read your book? Ultimately we do need that recognition in some shape or form. Publishing something without anyone actually reading it is meaningless even though I agree — just completing that body of work — is commendable in itself. That does mean however that being an successful author today means a lot more that it did, say, ten years ago. In the past your role stopped the moment you sent your manuscripts out to a bunch of agents or publishers. Now the moment you are ready to submit — is only the beginning — it’s what you do after that point that will most likely determine how successful your book is, how many people notice and read it.