Yzavela Narvaez (Yza-Dora)
Yzavela Narvaez
(Yza-Dora)
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Andrea Ring A E Ring
As a small business owner who has had hired many, many people, here's my take.

A degree, unfortunately, does not prepare you for a job. I have interviewed tons of recent grads for an entry-level position that offers potential for MUCH more. I am willing to train. BUT I only want to invest training time in someone who is willing to stay for a while. And someone with no job experience will take my training and move on.

And, because these grads have a degree, they feel they should earn a lot more than minimum wage. My entry-level jobs actually start at $15, but grads want more than that, even though they don't know how to professionally answer a phone, keep a calendar, use the basic functions of Word and Excel, mail a package, or send a fax.

If you have a degree but have never had a job, my advice is to seek out a job at a small business. (Don't go to Petco or Home Depot or those big places that make you apply online, unless those fields are specific to your degree.) Ask to speak to the owner. Promise to give them at least two years — that way, their investment in training you will actually see a return. See if you can negotiate starting at minimum wage during training, then a raise to an agreeable level once you can do the job independently. 

Or, find a family member or friend who would be willing to train you in basic job skills (see above). You can call it an internship on your resume.

The key to actually getting the job is in your attitude. I want someone enthusiastic. I want someone who can make eye contact and carry on a conversation. I want someone who is willing to learn. In the end, experience or no experience is highly dependent on the job, but I'm always willing to train the right person.