Children learn more from being “shown” than from being “told

2824
  100%
  0

Tags

Children’s books always contain moral lessons about the principles of right and wrong, but children don’t like to be “told” they learn the lessons a whole lot faster and make a lasting memory of it if the message is “shown” to them. Children’s books are the best tools to “show” moral lesson.

Children’s books always contain a moral lesson or message about the principles of right and wrong. Children don’t like to be “told” they learn the lessons a whole lot faster and make a lasting memory of it if the message is “shown” to them. Children’s books are the best tools to “show” moral lesson.

I remember going through a “sniffy” phase when I was about ten years old. I was good at various sports, my grades were outstanding, and I learned every subject at an accelerated pace. I was very proud of myself and started boasting about my achievements to everyone who would listen.  Although I noticed the resentment on the children’s and adults’ faces, I didn’t stop making a nuisance of myself with my continuous bragging.

My parents, especially my mother, were preaching to me day in and day out about how ugly that is to be sniffy, but their words went in one ear and came out the other. What they said didn’t sink in, and I continued the bragging. Moreover, I started looking down on other kids whose intellect were below my level.

It went on for weeks when I came across a book about a sniffy goose. He was boasting all the time about how smart and pretty he was. Reading about how his behavior made other animals feel made me realize that I behaved exactly like that annoying goose. My short-lived “sniffy” phase ended as quickly as it started to the great relieve of my parents and friends.

Recently I started writing children’s books. I saw a little boy at the Hospital communicating with his mother by using sign language. A young girl watched them from the other side of the waiting room, and I saw the same imperious expression on her face as I must have had when I was her age. I had a feeling that no amount of preaching about accepting and understanding people with disability would change her mind until she saw an example of her behavior.

My published children's books:

Bilingual Cildren's books

I published my first illustrated children’s book:  Look, I can Talk With My Fingers! that was translated into Spanish: Mira, Puedo Hablar Con Los Dedos!

A little girl teaches her family and her friends how to relate to someone who is hearing impaired

ENGLISH: http://tinyurl.com/jaag6cc 

Sandra enseña a su familia y amigos a comunicarse con personas con discapacidad auditiva.

SPANISH: http://tinyurl.com/hxbr2df

Pico, The Pesky Parrot

My next children’s book is Pico, the Pesky ParrotPico, el Loro Latoso

The purpose of this English and Spanish bilingual book is to show children the beauty of another language and that learning a new language doesn’t have to be boring, it could be fun. The story also delivers a message that when we don’t take the time to listen to each other, we tend to judge others quickly before we get to know them. http://tinyurl.com/hpwll6r

 ~Erika M Szabo

Author: http://www.authorerikamszabo.com/

Publishing Coach: http://www.goldenboxbooks.com/ 

Global Scriggler.DomainModel.Publication.Visibility
There's more where that came from!